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Noticeboard

Important Information for Patients


Our Clinical System is changing (Moving to EMIS)


 


The Practice will ‘Go-live’ on a new clinical computer system on Thursday 19th October 2017. The new system (EMIS Web) is in use by most of our practice colleagues within the Herts Valleys Clinical Commissioning Group including Rothschild House Surgery. It will ensure that we are able to continue to provide a good/improved service to our Patients for years to come.


 


Over the last few months, a lot of background work has taken place to enable us to plan and prepare for the implementation of this new system. Whilst we will do our very best to ensure disruption to Patients (and Staff) is kept to the minimum, we would like to prepare you for some necessary but, temporary disruption to services.


 


We will be migrating/moving all information from the current clinical system to the new EMIS system between 13th – 18th October 2017; during this time we will have limited access to certain areas of the system and ask for your assistance with the following;


 


Routine Repeat Prescriptions


 


We will not be issuing any routine repeat prescriptions during the migration to EMIS Web. We ask that you place any requests into the surgery by Wednesday 11th October 2017. Please note, if you order your prescriptions online – this service will not be available from mid-October.


 


From Monday 11th September 2017, where clinically safe to do so; patients will be issued with two months’ supply via a post-dated prescription.


 


Please check your requirements in advance and order your prescriptions in plenty of time.


 


Appointments


 


Whilst clinics will continue to run throughout this time, they will not be bookable in advance and will be for urgent appointments only.  Further information will be provided soon.


 


Online Patient Services


 


As this is a brand new system, it will, unfortunately, be necessary for Patients to re-register to use EMIS web. Re-registration cannot take place until after ‘Go-live’. In order to minimise inconvenience we will automatically re-register existing online service patients shortly after 19th October and send out your new username and password either by email or post.


 


We plan to keep the website updated with information and posters will be placed in the Practice waiting rooms. Where necessary, we may text you with updates and ask that you ensure we have the correct details for you.


 


Thank you in advance for your continued patience, support and understanding.

Should I get the Flu Vaccination?

Content Supplied by NHS Choices

For most people, flu is unpleasant but not serious. You will usually recover within a week.

However, certain people are at greater risk of developing serious complications of flu, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. These conditions may require hospital treatment.

The flu vaccine is offered free to people who are at risk, to protect them from catching flu and developing serious complications.

At-risk groups

It is recommended that you have a flu jab if you:

  • are 65 years old or over
  • are pregnant (see below)
  • have a serious medical condition (see below)
  • are living in a long-stay residential care home or other long-stay care facility (not including prisons, young offender institutions or university halls of residence)
  • are the main carer for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • are a frontline health or social care worker (see below)

If you are the parent of a child who is over six months old and has a long-term condition on the list below, speak to your GP about the flu vaccine. Your child's condition may get worse if they catch flu.

Pregnant women

It is recommended that all pregnant women should have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're in.

This is because there is good evidence that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu, particularly from the H1N1 strain.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be safely and effectively given during any trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not carry risks for either the mother or baby. In fact, studies have shown that mothers who have had the vaccine while pregnant pass some protection to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.

People with medical conditions

The flu vaccine is offered free to anyone who is over six months of age and has one of the following medical conditions:

If you live with someone who has a weakened immune system, you may also be able to have a flu vaccine. Speak to your GP about this.

Frontline health or social care workers

Employers are responsible for ensuring that arrangements are in place for frontline healthcare staff to have the flu vaccine.

Outbreaks of flu can occur in health and social care settings, and staff, patients and residents are at risk of infection.

Frontline health and social care staff should protect themselves by having the flu vaccine to prevent the spread of flu to colleagues and other members of the community.

If you care for someone who is elderly or disabled, speak to your GP about getting vaccinated against seasonal flu. You should also ensure that the person you care for has the flu jab.

Children

It has been recommeded that children from age 2 to 17 should also have the annual influenza vaccination.

However, it is unlikely that the vaccine, which will be given as a nasal spray rather than an injection, will be offered before 2014. For more information read our flu vaccine for children Q&A.


Who should not have the flu vaccination?

You should not have the flu vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu vaccine or one of its ingredients. This happens very rarely.

If you have had a confirmed very serious (anaphylactic) reaction to egg, have an egg allergy with uncontrolled asthma or another type of allergy to egg, your GP may decide that you should be vaccinated with an egg-free vaccine. One such vaccine is available for this flu season (called Preflucel, manufactured by Baxter Healthcare).

If no egg-free vaccine is available, your GP will identify a suitable vaccine with a low egg (ovalbumin) content, the details of which will be in the Green Book - Immunisation against infectious disease (PDF, 3.21Mb).

Depending on the severity of your egg allergy, your GP may decide to refer you to a specialist for vaccination in hospital.

If you are ill with a fever, do not have your flu jab until you have recovered.

 
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